Friday, August 22, 2014

Old World Design































Photo from June/July 2002 issue: belle - Australia, edited by lb for linenandlavender.net, here:  http://www.linenandlavender.net/2010/03/chateau-de-gignac.html



Image via Provencal Escapes, edited by lb for linenandlavender.net, here:  http://www.linenandlavender.net/2010/03/chateau-de-gignac.html



Côté Sud



coragupana as seen on linenandlavender.net






I especially love the old world feel and textures. I found a great site to accomplish these finishes and I also discovered a lot of these photos via http://linenandlavender.net .
 http://www.pinterest.com/bds1854/painted-finishes/

DIY Video:  http://www.diynetwork.com/videos/old-world-faux-finishes/8187.html

Sunday, August 10, 2014

Breathtaking!!!!!

Beck Residence by Horst Architects





Beck Residence by Horst Architects




Beck Residence by Horst Architects



Beck Residence by Horst Architects



Beck Residence by Horst Architects



Beck Residence by Horst Architects



Beck Residence by Horst Architects



Beck Residence by Horst Architects



Beck Residence by Horst Architects



Beck Residence by Horst Architects



This is totally a design I LOVE!!!!

Description by Horst Architects

Perched atop a rocky seaside promontory, this loft renovation is an efficient response to the problem of limited space with simplicity and restraint being the guiding principles of the design solution. The clients requested a design which would accommodate office work by day and intimate social and familial gatherings by night. The interior spaces have been completely reconfigured into an open plan evolving around a double height entry volume containing the principal stairway. Sliding partitions and fabric behind frameless glass have replaced traditional means of enclosure and spatial transition. A sculptural interplay of material, light and form define spaces, which are both intimate and communal, sheltering yet expansive. Indoor and outdoor living is integrated by frameless, bi-folding doors. Windows are positioned to embrace the view of the harbor, while second skin systems such as wood shutters mediate the late afternoon sun and provide privacy. The changing play of light on surfaces, the breezes that move through and around the structure, the touch and smell of walls and gardens, the play of colors, the sound of spaces all play a part in the reception of architecture as it is lived in, and are important determinants in our well being.

Friday, August 1, 2014

Design around Nature

Rodrigo Quadrado - Casa (Foto: Filippo Bamberghi)




Rodrigo Quadrado - Casa (Foto: Filippo Bamberghi)



Rodrigo Quadrado - Casa (Foto: Filippo Bamberghi)


If you know me, you know black is my favorite design palette. Like the little black dress it goes with
everything. As illustrated below, the art and accessories add the POP!!!


Rodrigo Quadrado - Casa (Foto: Filippo Bamberghi)





Rodrigo Quadrado - Casa (Foto: Filippo Bamberghi)




Rodrigo Quadrado - Casa (Foto: Filippo Bamberghi)





Rodrigo Quadrado - Casa (Foto: Filippo Bamberghi)




Rodrigo Quadrado - Casa (Foto: Filippo Bamberghi)

Love the simplicity of the lap pool.


Rodrigo Quadrado - Casa (Foto: Filippo Bamberghi)

Simple yet dramatic.


Rodrigo Quadrado - Casa (Foto: Filippo Bamberghi)


I do like the openness of this design, not sure about this tree in the middle. How do you guard against critters and the weather?

Friday, July 18, 2014

Tranquility

















































Description by Costis Psychas

Perivolas is the ultimate in laid back luxury. Poised on the cliff high above the Aegean, this intimate escape is designed as a place where you can let the rest of the world slip away. It’s just a short walk from Oia, the most beautiful village on Greece’s most romantic and dramatic island, Santorini. Built amphitheatrically, Perivolas’ secluded location combines expansive views with the luxury of absolute tranquillity. Terraced gardens spill down the slope to the infinity pool, which seems to slip off the rim of the cliff and bleed into the blue horizon. Only the occasional toll of church bells or the purring of a fishing boat far below breaks the meditative silence. It is easy to linger here all day, watching the changing light until the sun settles into the sea. Originally designed as a family home, Perivolas still feels like a private residence. Intimate in scale and atmosphere, every house is different. Built by native craftsmen using local materials, interiors embody Cycladic style, with its organic forms and smooth surfaces. Breezy rooms are naturally cooled by sculpted stone walls and vaulted ceilings pierced by skylights. Beds are built into snug alcoves,Niches and archways are scooped out of whitewashed walls, low-slung sofas offset by hand-woven rugs and cushions in vivid fuschia and lilac. All accommodations have terraces which offer uninterrupted Caldera sea views.

Monday, July 14, 2014

Peaceful and Serene




































This design is right up my alley with the water, the openness and the plants.

Description by Guz Architects

On a relatively small site at the end of a cul-de-sac, Wilkinson designed a tropical courtyard house with an identical parti to the Sun House: two pavilions on an L-shaped plan are placed at the perimeter, looking over a water garden comprising a large fishpond with an archipelago of tree-filled islands, which appears to merge with a lap pool encased in a sheer glass rim. These two houses are described by Wilkinson as his ‘most watery’, and the Cluny House does reinforce the oft-repeated observation that small tropical houses come alive when water is used as the focal point of a central courtyard. But to refer to this house as small seems rather incongruous, as the scale and transparency of the landscape, and the reflections of the sky and trees in the pond, conspire to allude to the infinite, with the architectural massing all but hidden. Wilkinson was using the water garden to draw the eye away from the structure and the elements, thus creating an over-riding illusion.
At the request of the client, the main staircase was enclosed within the house, a decision that prevented the usual two-level promenade architecturale of Wilkinson’s open circulation routes, which pass through an exposed staircase zone. As the house thus comprises two discrete floors, it possesses a distinctively dissimilar appearance on elevation to his contemporaneous houses. Wilkinson was able to turn this to his advantage, however, as by cantilevering second floor roof gardens along the length of the uniform elevation, he created a barrier of greenery to screen the upper level, so that the mass of the house appears recessed, hidden by the plantings. Further visual trickery was employed in the landscaping to hide the proportions of the architecture: Wilkinson was concerned that the proportions of the open verandah, projecting into the water garden, would appear short and stubby, so he spanned a vine draped trellis over the pool to continue the form and length of the fin-wall in the verandah.
The Cluny House was orientated towards its views, but every view is internal, confined within the boundaries of the site. Wilkinson designed a completely self-referential world, which provides its own delights and creates its own micro-climate. The most sublime vista is to be had from the long L-shaped walkway beneath the lip of the cantilevered roof gardens, where the low wide soffits ripple and sparkle in the sunlight reflected from the surface of the ponds. The panorama of tropical fecundity is languid and luscious, framed and contained by Wilkinson’s careful delineation of line and edge.